kutsuwamushi: (Default)
[personal profile] kutsuwamushi
More basic vocabulary from 한국어 1. HOW MANY CAN I TYPE BEFORE MIDNIGHT

고맙다 to be grateful
고브다 to be hungry
고향 hometown
공부하다 to study
공원 park
공항 airport
과일 fruit
귀 ear
극장 theater
기차 train
기침 cough
기침 하다 to cough
김치 kimchi
꽃 flower
끝나다 to be over, to end
끝내다 to finish

... apparently all of them, not including the grammar points. :D
kutsuwamushi: (Default)
[personal profile] kutsuwamushi
I've forgotten a lot of vocabulary so I'm going to start working through the vocabulary lists in the back of my textbooks. These are from 한국어 1, so consider them very basic.

가게 shop, store
가깝다 to be near, close
가다 to go*
가르치다 to teach
가족 family
감기 a cold
감기에 걸리다 to catch a cold
값 price
강의 lecture, class
같이 together
거기 there, that place
거리 street
걷다 to walk
걸어 가다/오다 to go/come walking
계시다 to be, to exist (honorific form)

* I need to do a post on the deictic verbs, because the English and Korean are not exact equivalents.
kutsuwamushi: (Default)
[personal profile] kutsuwamushi
Here are some names of countries. You can refer to someone from that country by adding 사람, for example 일본 사람 "Japanese person".

한국 Korea
일본 Japan
중국 China
영국 England
독일 Germany
스페인 Spain
러시아 Russia
아일랜드 Ireland
프랑스 France
말레이시아 Malaysia
미국 America

The story that the slur "gook" came from 국 may not be true.
kutsuwamushi: (Default)
[personal profile] kutsuwamushi
안녕하십니까? 저는 덱사스대학교 학생입이다. 이름은 박성수입니다. 학교 기숙사에 살고 있습니다.

Try translating this paragraph. You should be able to once you know the vocabulary. The construction used in "살고 있습니다" is described in the previous post.

Vocabulary:

안녕하십니까 hello (super polite)
저 I (polite)
덱사스 texas
대학교 college, university
학생 student
이름 name
기숙사 dormitory
살다 to live
-은/는 topic particle
이다 to be (copula)
있다 to be

Highlight for translation:

[Hello. I am a student at the University of Texas. My name is Park Seongsoo. I am living in the school dorm.]

Sorry for not updating for a few days. I've been really busy, and by the time I got home I just wanted to do something brainless like watch Doctor Who. :D
kutsuwamushi: (Default)
[personal profile] kutsuwamushi
As mentioned before before, Korean has two verbs meaning "to be." I covered 이다 and briefly mentioned 있다. 이다 can be thought of as something you are, and 있다 something you do.

For example, if I want to say "I'm at home," I would use 있다: 집에 있습니다. I'm not a house; I'm at my house. Does this make sense? I can dig up more examples if anyone wants them.

-고 있다 is a construction that can be added to an action verb to make it ongoing or habitual. Here are some examples from Using Korean:

학교에 오고 있다.
He's on his way to school.

한국에 살고 있습니다.
He's currently living in Korea.

아침으로 빵을 먹고 있습니다.
She's been eating bread for breakfast.

(Okay, I modified the last two to avoid the honorific forms, which might be too much for now...)
kutsuwamushi: (Default)
[personal profile] kutsuwamushi
In the last post, 가 and 나 discussed classroom furniture. Here is another dialog from the same textbook on a similar theme: verifying that yes, you have successfully identified an everyday object.

If you understand the grammar in the last post, you should be able to read this dialog. Try doing so before looking at the translation.

가: 이것은 시계입니까?
나: 네, 시계입니다.
가: 이것은 구두입니까?
나: 아니요, 구두 아닙니다. 그것은 운동화입니다.

Vocabulary:
이것 this
그것 that
시계 clock, watch
구두 dress shoes
운동화 sneakers
아니다 is not
네 yes
아니요 no (polite)

Read more... )

Highlight for translation:

[가: Is this a clock?
나: Yes, it is a clock.
가: Are these dress shoes?
나: No, they are not dress shoes. Those are sneakers.
]

Animals

Aug. 29th, 2010 03:20 pm
kutsuwamushi: (Default)
[personal profile] kutsuwamushi
나비 butterfly
소 cow
거미 spider
모기 mosquito
사자 lion
파리 fly (insect)
까치 magpie
개미 ant
새 bird
게 crab
돼지 pig
곰 bear

More vocabulary from 한국어 1, most from the "learn how to read hangeul" chapters.
kutsuwamushi: (Default)
[personal profile] kutsuwamushi
가구 furniture
비누 soap
벽 wall
부엌 kitchen
집 house
빨래 laundry
숟가락 spoon
냉장고 refrigerator
층 floor (as in level)
침대 bed

Picking some domestic vocabulary out of 한국어 1's glossary. One thing that I really dislike about this textbook is that it doesn't have much vocabulary at all. It really needs more.

Believe it or not, this is all of the vocabulary for things around the house that I found in it.
kutsuwamushi: (Default)
[personal profile] kutsuwamushi
과 lesson
책 book
창문 window
볼펜 ballpoint pen
문 door
연필 pencil
공책 notebook
가방 bag

Edit: You know, one day I'll actually get the word for "window" right. The first time I somehow typed 칠문, which came from God knows where.

Then a helpful person pointed out that I had it wrong, and I changed it to ... 장문. No. It should be right now, though. Maybe.
kutsuwamushi: (Default)
[personal profile] kutsuwamushi
My first Korean dialog. 가, having drunk way too much the previous night before and having difficulty seeing straight, turns to 나 for help identifying items of furniture.

가: 이것은 무엇입니까?
나: 책상입나다.
가: 저것은 무엇입니까?
나: 저것은 의자입니다.

Highlight for translation:

[가: What is this?
나: It's a desk.
가: What is that?
나: That's a chair.
]

Vocabulary:

이것 this
저것 that
무엇 what
은/는 topic particle
책상 desk
의자 chair
이다 to be

Down the rabbit hole )

I love the ridiculousness of textbook dialog! From 한국어 1 by 서울대학교 언어교육원.

신다

Aug. 10th, 2010 01:33 pm
kutsuwamushi: (Default)
[personal profile] kutsuwamushi
Some words that are used with 신다. See the explanation of 입다/신다 here.

신발 shoes
부츠 boots
실내화 indoor shoes
양말 socks
운동화 sneakers
팬티 스타킹 panty hose*
구두 dress shoes
장화 rubber boots
판타롱/밴드 스타킹 knee-length/thigh-length stockings

* Note that this can also be used with 입다.
kutsuwamushi: from a Married to the Sea Comic (edumacation)
[personal profile] kutsuwamushi
In English, we have mornings, afternoons, evenings,and night-times. Korean has at least one extra word for the times of day, though - one I think is very useful.

새벽 - the early morning before sunrise, from about four to six

The other words for the times of day match pretty closely to their English equivalents, as far as I can tell.

아침 - morning (also: 오전)
오후 - afternoon
전녁 - evening
- night

Telling actual time in Korean involves two sets of numbers, so I'll save them for another day.
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